It’s Not Rocket Science

“Mama, mama,” Carson cried, tugging at his mother’s pants, pointing to a tv screen. “I want. Pleeeeeesssssseeeeee.”

His mother stopped pushing the cart and watched the commercial. It was for the new Super Mario Brothers 3 that had just been released. As she watched and Carson pleaded, she knew it was no use. If it wasn’t this one with her, it would be one of the other three boys at home, one of which was thirty-two years old, that would want it.

She walked over to the clerk and requested a copy. Carson was giddy with delight as he watched the clerk unlock the glass cabinet and pull out a copy. He practically drooled as the clerk handed the game to his mother who put it in the cart. He knew better than to reach in and try to take the game. That’s what got his brothers banned from ever going to K-Mart with their mother.

He was on his best behavior the whole way home and even helped bring in the sacks full Halloween candy. He waited by the counter staring at the video game.

“Ok. You can have it.”

Carson squealed, grabbed the package, and ran into the living room announcing their newest game. Male screams erupted as their former game was ripped from the console and the new one put in.

The next five hours were spent listening to increasing frustration, crying, raging, and eventually the sounds of controllers being slammed to the ground as her children and husband stormed off their respective consolation corners. With the living room free, she silently walked in, put the cartridge back in and had made it to World 6 before anyone calmed down enough to notice. As each member of her family walked dazed into the living room watching her do what they could not.

“What?” she asked, as she completed the World. “It’s not rocket science.”


This was inspired by the fact that today, July 8th, is National Video Game Day. If Nintendo were not the butts they are I would be playing the NES classic edition right now, but our county received 0 units this release or last release….butts!

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The Artist And The Fly

The art director sat in the restoration room repairing the museum’s rare Bosch painting when he became distracted by a fly buzzing around his head. He tried ignoring it, but the more ignored it, the more the fly demanded his attention.

“Alright, this means war,” he said.

He fetched a fly swatter and returned to kill the fly, but it wasn’t there.

“Figures.”

Returning to the repairing the painting, the fly demanded his attention once again. A failed deadly attack flung the fly into the white paint where he would eventually die.

The art director sat back and admired his handiwork and went upstairs to let the European Collection manager know it was complete. When they returned the smile quickly faded.

Neither the collection’s manager or the museum director accepted the former art director’s explanation of why their priceless Bosch was covered in little white dots.

Two Peas In A Pod

Lincoln always had trouble with words and ideas. He never felt scintillating enough or lissome with words.  Oh, it wasn’t that he couldn’t think of things, it was just that his words didn’t sound like anyone else’s. He always felt like he was missing something. In school, he was laughed at, and at home he was picked on by his siblings. The only one who understood him was Great-Grandpa Dick. They spoke the same language. Understood each other perfectly. Dick told Lincoln it was because they shared the same soul. It wasn’t until Dick died that Lincoln felt complete.


This short was inspired by:

FOWC with Fandango — scintillating
Word of the Day Challenge — lissome

 

Feeling Blue

Indigo never understood why people associated feeling blue with sadness. She was almost always happy, and her name meant blue. The ocean is blue and full of life. She could spend hours in the aquarium watching the jellyfish float gently though the water. The sky is blue and makes people happy when it is clear. Oh, she knew the air wasn’t really blue and there was some scientific reason for the sky being blue, but she didn’t care. Blue was a perfect color. Flowers came in blue and made people happy. No, feeling blue doesn’t mean sad, it means alive.