Don’t Trust A Snoozer

Brandon coasted through life on snooze. As a child he was home-schooled because he refused to get up on time without a fight. High school years were spent taking snooze classes until ten, then only the easiest classes he could register for. The day he turned eighteen he applied for the nightwatchman position on a rail line that only ran day trains, but because the railroad was required to have an emergency watch, they needed someone. He loved the job and held it for more than forty years. He could sit on the porch and watch the fireflies and stars and snooze through as he had always done. Everything was heaven until the Number Six’s engines failed while taking a full load of red-eye passengers to Chicago and was sent barreling down the side line through Brandon’s station. He was too busy snoozing through his shift to notice the urgent calls for help blasting through the office where he was supposed to be sitting. Three hundred and sixty-two friends, lovers, parents, and children lost their lives because Brandon was snoozing through life.


This short was inspired by FOWC with Fandango – snooze

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4 thoughts on “Don’t Trust A Snoozer

    1. Not really sleeping…disillusioned and living in their created bubbles. Some bubbles are thousands of miles long and wide, and filled with millions of people…some are small and only contain close relatives and friends who want to share the same bubble. What people don’t know how to handle anymore is when those bubbles meet. I used to say (and still do) that towns kept the village idiots under control, but now the Internet allows village idiots to find other village idiots and they don’t feel so different. Now we have a village idiot in command and everyone is crawling out of the woodwork. The problem is, some of the village idiots online are not even human. It is easy to fall in to the rhetoric as has been proven by all sides. I guess every village idiot needs their day…unfortunately this one’s going to last four years (which is a blink on an eye in the long run).

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